In Pursuit of the Aurora : A Personal Best

Ahoy Readers!

Tonight left me speechless, and if you had seen the explosive, pulsating reds and greens across the sky, you may have been too. DISCLAIMER : Poeticism, superlatives, and lists of glamorous, stunning, beautiful adjectives will abound in this post, for this was no mere night and cannot be described with just plain words :P. If this grammatical superfulism is not your style,  I would not blame you for skipping straight to the images on this one.

The aurora tonight was viewed about  5 miles from Murphy Dome. It started out as small pinnacles of colorless light in the sky which reminded me of shafts of lights streaming through a window into a dusty room — the cosmos is indeed full of dusty rooms. At first I thought the northern lights were just lights from the town. But it was not so. The lights began to grow brighter and quickly showed their emerald sheen.  They grew into blended columns of dark green, light green, lime-green, and moss green light that filled the northern sky. The green gave way to red, but by give-way I don’t mean they were replaced entirely. Rather. the towers of green pierced through the red back drop that saturated the sky to the north-northwest. The reds acted very differently than the greens, and seemed to never pick a form. They chose to just be the canvas for the greens to dance upon. And dance they did. Flowing curtains of green morphed and changed so rapidly that remembering what it used to look like only tore your attention away from concentrating on its new shape. Because the band of Lights split the cosmos going 180 degrees from horizon to horizon, the direction that you craned your head was important to your viewing experience. I would recommend the UP -Crane because the UP-Crane allows you to view the nucleus of the aurora. Above your head, on nights such as this was one, the core of the Aurora reaches into the depths of space. The pillars which serve to block the sky in banded patterns to your left and right seem to stretch out and lengthen as you stare directly up at them. Like balancing a pencil on  your nose by its eraser and then focusing on its sharpened tip. This portal of time feels like it would lead you to another dimension if you could jump just high enough to each it. The nucleus of the aurora is often the fastest changing. It grows and contracts while sending out electric pulses which pop, undulate, and meander across this sky. The beauty of the Aurora in its complete randomness.

Getting away from some of the poetry, I’d like to talk about my next upgrade in Aurora photography. First it was know-how, second it was cold-beating insulation (still in development) and now one of the next steps in my Aurora photography is a wide angle lens. However, I’m not that versed in lenses (especially old ones) and I would love to hear opinions on wide angle lenses for Micro-four Thirds. I’m looking for anything that would give me wider than 18mm ( in 35mm equivalent) and have considered old c-mount lenses (Cosmicar 8.5mm f/1.5) as well as MFT such as the panasonic 7-14 mm f/4.0. Leave a comment if you have any thoughts!

Without further ado, here’s some pictures from the night. The images start with the low-level reds which were soon exploding across the sky. Sorry for the intrusive Watermarks on these images, but I’m being a bit more protective of these captures compared to some others. Remember, if you ever want an image, be sure to contact me!

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The start of the reds overhead with my companions outside of Murphy Dome. This was just the start of something incredible!
The watermelon aurora.
The watermelon aurora.
The watermelon aurora.
The watermelon aurora.
The mixing of the reds and the greens was fascinating and differed from the distinctly separated watermelon aurora
The mixing of the reds and the greens was fascinating and differed from the distinctly separated watermelon aurora
The mixing of the reds and the greens was fascinating and differed from the distinctly separated watermelon aurora
The mixing of the reds and the greens was fascinating and differed from the distinctly separated watermelon aurora
Do you see the angel in this Aurora?
Do you see the angel in this Aurora?
 

11 thoughts on “In Pursuit of the Aurora : A Personal Best”

  1. Holy cow! Your poetizing was superb…and was exceeded by photoizing. Third photo looks like a green-quilled aurora-porcupine. Final photo was their version of a peacock launching toward the Milky Way. Was the aurora also symphonicizing during the show?

    1. Haha, yeah, well. It might be a bit abstract. I guess Chuck (my dad) from above sees “Final photo was their version of a peacock launching toward the Milky Way”. So, it’s open to interpretation!

    1. Hi Ian,
      Your abilities are truly special & great! I see the angel in all of the pics. What a gift you have given us!
      Peg Blood, choir buddy

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