Tag Archives: Nepenthes Saguinea

Nepenthes Saguinea : 31 Days of Swelling and Growth

The last 31 days my camera has sat in the same place collecting dust. However, that’s not to say I haven’t been using it. The camera has been taking 1 picture every hour for 24 hours a day of Nepenthes saguinea, a tropical pitcher plant. Growing carnivorous plants has been a hobby of mine for 7 years now. During that time I had always wondered what it looks like when they grow, and it was that question I set out to answer. The video below demonstrates the growth of the plant. Watch as its frills unfurl, water forms in the bottom, and it sways and swells :).

Nepenthes saguinea is native to Malaysia where it grows from 300-1800 meters elevation (Source : Wikipedia). The pitchers of the plant captures bugs which cannot climb its steep and slippery walls. The┬áplant in the video is a cutting from a large mother plant; the cutting is now 2.5 years old. The mother plant was purchased in 2007 and has traveled with me from Minnesota, to Wisconsin, to Maine, and now to Alaska. Certainly, I’ve learned a lot about them along the way. For instance, in Fairbanks the sap forms long threads which was not observed in other states. Also, the mature mother plant vines once it reaches about 4 years old, and it’s at that point that cuttings can be easily made. For the most part these plants are easy to take care of. The most important piece is that the soil never dries out. Rather than being chained to my plant like it’s a dog or cat, I have recently built a watering system which pours water on the plant twice per week. There’s a lot of peace of mind knowing the plants are watered when I’m gone on vacation!

Nepethes Saguinea is not used to growing in low humidity (20%) conditions. In Fairbanks, the drops of insect attracting sap formed long icicles.
Nepethes Saguinea is not used to growing in low humidity (20%) conditions. In Fairbanks, the drops of insect attracting sap formed long icicles.

This blog has actually prompted me to look back for pictures of the plants for comparison. It’s amazing to look at the difference in the plants from 6 years ago. How about some before and after? The frills of the sagnuinea seem diminished on the larger pitchers today. Also, the frills are non-existent on the newest truncata pictures.

Nepenthes Saguinea 6 years before and after

1a. Incredibly, here's the picture of my Nepenthes Saquinea which has not spawned other plants, and traveled through 4 states. Pictured here in 2006 in my dorm room in Wisconsin....
1a. Incredibly, here’s the picture of my Nepenthes Saquinea which has not spawned other plants, and traveled through 4 states. Pictured here in 2006 in my dorm room in Wisconsin….
1b.... and here it is today! The vine sprawls and has many, many pitchers.
1b…. and here it is today! The vine sprawls and has many, many pitchers.

Nepenthes truncata 6 years before and after

2a. Here's a picture of Nepenthes Truncata in 2006 in my dorm room in Wisconsin. I was pretty proud of those finger sized pitchers...
2a. Here’s a picture of Nepenthes Truncata in 2006 in my dorm room in Wisconsin. I was pretty proud of those finger sized pitchers…
2b.... which now spawns 11 inch pitchers that I can't get my hand around.
2b…. which now spawns 11 inch pitchers that I can’t get my hand around.
2c... Nepenthes Trucata pitcher after 6 years of growth.
2c… Nepenthes Trucata pitcher after 6 years of growth.

If you want to know more about growing carnivorous plants leave a comment below, I’ll tell you what I learned about growing them! The plants can serve great functions in your house. In particular, sundews are great for removing a fruit fly population, and the pitcher plants will snag lots of wasps!